Tag Archives: Joy to sew

Fall Palette Challenge: Double-knit Pencil Skirt, Two Ways

9 Dec

Just a quick post today which is very appropriate given these skirts can be easily whipped up in an evening.

There really isn’t a lot to add as I’ve already sung the joys of both double-knit (Bonus Christmas Dress, Amazing Fit Dress, Gertie Dress) and Burdastyle’s Jenny Skirt pattern (here, here, here, and more).

I found the fabric during this trip to Walthamstow market for £2.20/metre from Classic Textiles which is a stupidly good price.

I bought a metre and a half, just planning on making this classic version (only alterations were addition of a back vent and halving the waistband height) but there was enough left over make the mini version(ok so this counts as mini for me) below.

For the second skirt I used the jenny pattern and all the length of the fabric left over. From the scraps I cut a strip the length of my waist measurement and about 3in wide. I used an invisible zip on both skirts and this double knit has enough stretch that I was able to use it to make a standard waistband. Then on a whim I added little patch pockets to the front.

This is probably the most realistic picture of what I wear most days. It was just a whim to make this version but I swear it has become one of the most worn thing in my wardrobe.

4 hours, £3, 2 skirts, 1 very happy camper.

Ps. Yup, I’m still working on the Colette Pattern Fall Palette Challenge. You can see the details and progress so far by clicking the ‘Fall Wardrobe‘ link at the top of the page.

Sewaholic Minoru Muslin/Sweater-dress + FBA

29 Nov

I find myself with a bit of a problem. Whilst my brain knows that making a muslin is not a waste of fabric I seem to be physically incapable of disposing of one once it’s made.

Which goes a little way to explaining this odd sweater/dress hybrid.

I want to make an all-weather version of Sewaholic’s latest pretty and practical pattern – the Minoru Jacket. Tasia’s sew-a-long begins in earnest in January but I thought I’d get a head start on the muslin being that it usually causes much feet dragging. I had some double-knit which would work and really I just wanted to check that the full-bust adjustment would work okay on the dartless bodice.

Here’s how it went:

(click to enlarge)

ETA: On regular version add the length created at Line 3 to the front placket and zip, too.

 It worked just fine and I now know when it comes to making the real version I’ll need a 34in separating zipper not a 32in due to the additional length from the FBA.

Still I didn’t want to waste a zipper I can’t really afford on a muslin so I thought to myself… what would happen if I cut the front on a fold (adding in the width of the button placket)? Answer is… a Sweater-Dress. It’s very comfortable despite being unlined and the fact I messed the collar up royally. I didn’t notice the front placket went up to the top of the collar so I forgot to add the additional length and then I went and sewed it on backwards. Oh well, good thing it’s just a knock-around for home.

 The pattern itself is so lovely to sew, and now I have my alterations all done I can’t wait for January.

Fall Palette Challenge: White Lace Tee

19 Oct

Number three on my Fall Palette Challenge wardrobe may be my most favourite item this year.

It’s a simple white lace kimono sleeved tee, based off Colette’s free Sorbetto tank pattern. I raised the neck front and back then used this tutorial from Analog Me  to draft the kimono sleeve.

The lace is a cotton found on Goldhawke Road which the proprieter swore had also been purchased by buyers from top shop (hmmm, take that with a grain of salt) however at only £4 a meter it was a good deal. The underlining is a slinky synthetic twill that feels really soft and would be a nightmare to sew if it weren’t together with the cotton lace.

I cut the lace out first then squared the edges of the lining on the cutting board securing with pins. With the lace on top I used more pins to hold it in place before hand-basting around the edges and along the dart legs. Once the basting was in place, cutting the slinky fabric was easy and the rest of the top was sewn as one layer.

What I really like about it is that the simplicity of the pattern meant I could spend more time on things like this and french seams and hand-tacked binding. The details combined with the silkiness and weight of the fabric means that this feels like a quality garment even if it only cost £7. It’s something about the heaviness of the fabric that reminds me of trying on expensive clothes, I think.

This may be my favourite Sorbetto yet.

Betty Dress: Vogue 8631

5 Aug

I don’t know why, but this dress feels like a ‘Betty’ to me. It’s Very Easy Vogue 8631 and it was an absolute dream to sew. Maybe it’s because I’ve been sewing with a few tricky fabrics lately and this was plain old polka-dotty cotton, but it went together easily, all the instructions made sense, all the bits fit together well, and the only thing I found odd is that it relies on just a hook and eye to keep the front closed.

It’s a pretty simple design with maximum pay off. The bodice has kimono sleeves and two pleats, the skirt has 3 pleats. The back has two skirt darts, two back darts and two tiny neckline darts to keep it fitted. The centre back skirt seam is curved slightly so I couldn’t match the pattern as well as the centre back bodice seam.

And here’s the detail on the gorgeous pleating.

Bust

Waistline

I’ll definitely be sewing this one again. Originally I purchased the pattern (as part of the box-o-patterns) to make up something like this dress from Tory Burch. Maybe even using sari fabric?

Tory Burch Resort 2011 via style.com

TOTAL COST:

Pattern: US$3.99

Fabric: $14.5 (2.9m @ $5/m – Spotlight)

Thread: $3.0

TOTAL: NZ$25.50 / US$$17.70